poésie poésie poésie poésie
Poésie Citation
Poésie
Photos Poètiques
Spectacle culture
Biographie
Biographie
Auteur écrivain 20ème siècle
Poésie du 20 ème siècle
Auteur écrivain 19ème siècle
Poésie du 19 ème siècle
Pièces de Théâtre
Le Théâtre
Poésies 16ème
poésie ancienne
Poésie du 16ème siècle
Poésie du 17ème siècle
Poésie du 18ème siècle
Poésie anglo-saxonne
Poemes turcs
poésie brésilienne
Blagues
Blague
Poesie citation flux RSS
www.poesie-citation.fr


Poésie arrow Poésie anglo-saxonne arrow Lord Byron
 
Facebook Poésie Citation
 twitter Poésie Citation feed Suivez nous sur Scoop.it
Fables Romans
Fables Jean De La Fontaine
Romans Livres
Poèmes
blog poeme
Poésie contemporaine
Forum Poesie
Concours poésie
Philosophie
Proverbe -Proverbes
Proverbe
Dictons
Dicton Dictons
Citations
Citation Citations
Soumettre une citation
Citation People
L'amour
Amour
Enfants
Enfant
halloween
Noël
Messages du forum
Attention Petite...
Rosa 16-05-13
Re:Le vrai Amour !
Rosa 14-02-13
joyeux saint valentin !
Rosa 14-02-13
Re:Si je vivais près de toi
Rosa 13-02-13
Re:CHEESE CAKE AUX FRAISES
Rosa 13-02-13
slam de poésie
pilote le hot
poésie citation
Les partenaires
Plan du site
Chercher ?
 
Fan de cuisine

Fan de cuisine !

découvrez

les meilleures recettes de cuisine

Lord Byron - poésie et poèmes de Lord Byron
Lord Byron histoire et biographie de Lord Byron
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
Byron le poète

De par une sensibilité étonnante et un génie irrévocable à maîtriser la rime tel  Don Juan qui maniait avec grâce l’épée de la Séduction ; le nom de George Gordon Byron brille encore comme celui de l’une des figures emblématiques du romantisme anglais du XIXème siècle.

Or, « qu’est-ce un nom ? Ce n’est ni une main, ni un bras, ni un visage », au-delà du nom de Lord Byron s’illustre un talent jamais égalée et une poésie qui reflète son âme d’une sensibilité singulière.  

Sa rime reflète ses angoisses, les tragédies qui jonchaient son parcours, ses Amours passionnées et toute la fragilité d’un être hors du commun.

 Portrait Lord Bryon

Lord Byron histoire et biographie de Lord Byron
 

 


Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
CANTO THE FOURTH.
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 2
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage


     I.

   I stood in Venice, on the Bridge of Sighs;
   A palace and a prison on each hand:
   I saw from out the wave her structures rise
   As from the stroke of the enchanter’s wand:
   A thousand years their cloudy wings expand
   Around me, and a dying glory smiles
   O’er the far times when many a subject land
   Looked to the wingèd Lion’s marble piles,
Where Venice sate in state, throned on her hundred isles!

 

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
CANTO THE THIRD
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage


     I.

   Is thy face like thy mother’s, my fair child!
   Ada! sole daughter of my house and heart?
   When last I saw thy young blue eyes, they smiled,
   And then we parted, - not as now we part,
   But with a hope. -
                    Awaking with a start,
   The waters heave around me; and on high
   The winds lift up their voices: I depart,
   Whither I know not; but the hour’s gone by,
When Albion’s lessening shores could grieve or glad mine eye.

 

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
CANTO THE SECOND
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage

CANTO THE SECOND.

     I.

   Come, blue-eyed maid of heaven! - but thou, alas,
   Didst never yet one mortal song inspire -
   Goddess of Wisdom! here thy temple was,
   And is, despite of war and wasting fire,
   And years, that bade thy worship to expire:
   But worse than steel, and flame, and ages slow,
   Is the drear sceptre and dominion dire
   Of men who never felt the sacred glow
That thoughts of thee and thine on polished breasts bestow.

 

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
CANTO THE FIRST.
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage



     I.

   Oh, thou, in Hellas deemed of heavenly birth,
   Muse, formed or fabled at the minstrel’s will!
   Since shamed full oft by later lyres on earth,
   Mine dares not call thee from thy sacred hill:
   Yet there I’ve wandered by thy vaunted rill;
   Yes! sighed o’er Delphi’s long-deserted shrine
   Where, save that feeble fountain, all is still;
   Nor mote my shell awake the weary Nine
To grace so plain a tale - this lowly lay of mine.

 

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
TO IANTHE.
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 2
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage



   Not in those climes where I have late been straying,
   Though Beauty long hath there been matchless deemed,
   Not in those visions to the heart displaying
   Forms which it sighs but to have only dreamed,
   Hath aught like thee in truth or fancy seemed:
   Nor, having seen thee, shall I vainly seek
   To paint those charms which varied as they beamed -
   To such as see thee not my words were weak;
To those who gaze on thee, what language could they speak?

 

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
For glances beget ogles, ogles sighs
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 3
poems
For glances beget ogles, ogles sighs,
Sighs wishes, wishes words, and words a letter,
Which flies on wings of light-heel'd Mercuries,

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
I said that like a picture by Giorgione
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems

I said that like a picture by Giorgione
Venetian women were, and so they are,
Particularly seen from a balcony
(For beauty's sometimes best set off afar),

 

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
One of those forms which flit by us, when we
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
One of those forms which flit by us, when we
Are young, and fix our eyes on every face;
And, oh! the loveliness at times we see
In momentary gliding, the soft grace,

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
Love in full life and length, not love ideal
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
Love in full life and length, not love ideal,
No, nor ideal beauty, that fine name,
But something better still, so very real,
That the sweet model must have been the same;

Commentaires (1)

Lire la suite...
 
Whose tints are truth and beauty at their best
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
Whose tints are truth and beauty at their best;
And when you to Manfrini's palace go,
That picture (howsoever fine the rest)
Is loveliest to my mind of all the show;

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
They've pretty faces yet, those same Venetians
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
They've pretty faces yet, those same Venetians,
Black-eyes, arch'd brows, and sweet expressions still;
Such as of old were copied from the Grecians,
In ancient arts by moderns mimick'd ill;



Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
Of all the places where the Carnival
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
Of all the places where the Carnival
Was most facetious in the days of yore,
For dance, and song, and serenade, and ball,

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
That is to say, if your religion's Roman
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 1
poems
That is to say, if your religion's Roman,
And you at Rome would do as Romans do,
According to the proverb, — although no man

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
And therefore humbly I would recommend
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
And therefore humbly I would recommend
"The curious in fish-sauce," before they cross
The sea, to bid their cook, or wife, or friend,

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
And thus they bid farewell to carnal dishes
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
And thus they bid farewell to carnal dishes,
And solid meats, and highly spiced ragouts,
To live for forty days on ill-dress'd fishes,
Because they have no sauces to their stews;

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
This feast is named the Carnival, which being
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
This feast is named the Carnival, which being
Interpreted, implies "farewell to flesh:"
So call'd, because the name and thing agreeing,
Through Lent they live on fish, both salt and fresh.

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
But saving this, you may put on whate'er
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
But saving this, you may put on whate'er
You like by way of doublet, cape, or cloak.
Such as in Monmouth-street, or in Rag Fair,
Would rig you out in seriousness or joke;

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
You'd better walk about begirt with briars
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
You'd better walk about begirt with briars,
Instead of coat and smallclothes, than put on
A single stitch reflecting upon friars,
Although you swore it only was in fun;

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
And there are dresses splendid, but fantastical
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poems
And there are dresses splendid, but fantastical,
Masks of all times and nations, Turks and Jews,
And harlequins and clowns, with feats gymnastical,
Greeks, Romans, Yankee-doodles, and Hindoos;

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
The moment night with dusky mantle covers
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 3
poems
The moment night with dusky mantle covers
The skies (and the more duskily the better),
The time less liked by husbands than by lovers
Begins, and prudery flings aside her fetter;

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
Beppo
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 1
poems
'T is known, at least it should be, that throughout
All countries of the Catholic persuasion,
Some weeks before Shrove Tuesday comes about,
The people take their fill of recreation,

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
La Malédiction de Minerve
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 3
poésie
Sur les collines de la Morée s'abaisse avec lenteur le soleil couchant, plus charmant à sa dernière heure. Ce n'est pas une clarté obscure, comme dans nos climats du nord ; c'est une flamme sans voile, une lumière vivante. Les rayons jaunes qu'il darde sur la mer calmée dorent la verte cime de la vague onduleuse et tremblante. Au vieux rocher d'Égine et à l'île d'Hydra, le dieu de l'allégresse envoie un sourire d'adieu ; il suspend son cours pour éclairer encore ces régions qu'il Aime, mais d'où ses autels ont disparu. L'ombre des montagnes descend rapidement et vient baiser ton golfe glorieux, Salamine indomptée ! Leurs arcs azurés, s'étendant au loin à l'horizon, se revêtent d'un pourpre plus foncé sous la chaleur de son regard ; çà et là sur leurs sommets, des teintes plus éclairées attestent son joyeux passage, et reflètent les couleurs du ciel, jusqu'à ce qu'enfin sa lumière est voilée aux regards de la terre et de l'Océan, et derrière son rocher de Delphes il s'affaisse et s'endort.

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
Le Premier Baiser de l’amour
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 12
poésie
Arrière les fictions de vos Romans imbéciles,
ces trames de mensonges tissues par la Folie !
Donnez-moi le doux rayon d'un regard qui vient du cœur,
ou le transport que l'on éprouve au premier baiser de l'Amour.

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
À Caroline
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 6
poésie
Crois-tu donc que j'aie vu sans m'émouvoir tes beaux yeux baignés de larmes me supplier de rester ; que j'aie été sourd à tes soupirs qui en disaient plus que des paroles n'auraient pu en dire ?

Quelque vive que fût l'afliction qui faisait couler tes larmes, en voyant ainsi se briser nos espérances et notre Amour, crois-moi, fille adorée, ce cœur saignait d'une blessure non moins profonde que la tienne.

Commentaires (1)

Lire la suite...
 
Épitaphe d'un ami
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 1
poésie
O toi que j'ai tant aimé, toi qui me seras éternellement cher, de combien d'inutiles pleurs j'ai arrosé ta tombe révérée ? Que de gémissements j'ai poussés à ton lit de mort, pendant que tu te débattais dans ta dernière agonie ! Si des larmes avaient pu retarder le tyran dans sa marche, si des gémissements avaient pu détourner sa faux impitoyable, si la jeunesse et la vertu avaient pu obtenir de lui un court délai, et la beauté lui faire oublier sa proie, à ce spectre, tu vivrais encore, charme de mes yeux, aujourd'hui gonflés de pleurs ;

Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
sur la mort d'une jeune demoiselle
Appréciation des utilisateurs: / 0
poésie

sur la mort d'une jeune demoiselle, cousine de l'auteur, et qui lui fut bien chère

 

Les vents retiennent leur haleine ; le soir est calme et sombre ; aucun zéphyr n'erre dans le bocage ; et moi, je vais revoir la tombe de ma Marguerite, et répandre des Fleurs sur la cendre que j'Aime.


Commenter

Lire la suite...
 
 
Jean de La Fontaine est l'auteur des Fables de La Fontaine. Jean de la Fontaine est un contemporain de Molière , Nicolas Boileau , Racine ou Corneille, Il vécurent tous sous le règne du Roi Louis XIV le roi soleil

© 2014

 

Parcourez les thèmes de poésie et citations les plus consultés

L'Amour, Aimer, Citation séduction, Saint Valentin, Homme, Femme, Poésie contemporaine, Poésie anglaise, Poésie brésilienne, Poésie ancienne,

Poésie 16ème siècle, Poésie 17ème siècle, Poésie 18ème siècle, Poésie 19ème siècle, Poésie 20ème siècle.

Partenaires et sites ayant un interet par leur qualité : Citation d'amour , Salvador de Bahia , Les bateaux Aviation civile , Amérique du sud